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Cryptonym: LISAMPAN

Definition:
LISAMPAN was a multiaudio project covering the Cuban Embassy and the residence of the Cuban ambassador in Mexico, installed in late 1964.
Status:
Unknown
Sources:

104-10414-10124: MEXICO CITY STATION HISTORY

"LISAMPAN was a multiaudio project covering the Cuban Embassy and the residence of the Cuban ambassador in Mexico. David M. Wilsted and the two LIFEAT telephone linemen, LIFEUD-2 and LIFEUD-3, made the installations. The group also tapped the TELEX system of two Soviet Bloc official installations.

104-10414-10124: MEXICO CITY STATION, EXCERPTS

"The LIENVOY project tapped every telephone in the Cuban embassy. (REDACTED) The advantage of LISAMPAN (which to some ways duplicated LIENVOY coverage) was that it also provided conversations in the areas of the telephones by persons other than the callers. Thus, LISAMPAN supplemented the content from LIENVOY."

104-10414-10124: MEXICO CITY STATION HISTORY

LISAMPAN was the Mexico City station's "only unilateral audio network".

104-10414-10124: MEXICO CITY STATION HISTORY

LISAMPAN was first proposed in October 1966 when the Mexico City station learned one of its agents, LIFEUD-2 (LIFEAT Project), a lineman for the Mexico City telephone company, would have access to the Cuban compound in connection with a modernization program of the telephone system. The installations (in 1967) were supervised by David W. Wilsted, supervising agent of the LIFEAT project, who in turn was directed by the inside case officer for the project, Michael J. Farmer (replaced in fall 1966). Management of the monitors and transcribers was handled by REDACTED, the Cuban section leader at the station. Transcripts were processed by station personnel in this section.

104-10414-10124: MEXICO CITY STATION HISTORY

LISAMPAN was a unilateral audio penetration of the Cuban Embassy and consulate in Mexico City from September 1967 until May 1969 when silence came to the last of the six audio devices."

Contributors:
Bill Simpich

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